Honneur a nos Liberateurs

If every object has a story, then that told by a 24-foot banner, embroidered with the phrase that translates so simply as Honour to our Liberators, is an epic. In 1944, it soared above the village of Aubers in northern France to celebrate the defeat of the Nazi occupation. Now, it is a treasured artefact in the collection of the 2nd Air Division Memorial Library in Norwich.  Its meaning and symbolism – the stories and lives woven into its fabric – are multitudinous; the past is a cross weave, and there are myriad ways to unpick and trace the threads. The story of an American airman who was saved from German capture by the French Resistance is just one thread in that banner of the liberation…

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Beyond ‘Rosie’: the Women’s Army Corps

With her blue overalls, hair tied back, and power tool in hand, ‘Rosie the Riveter’ has come to personify the roles that American women played in the Second World War. Though factory work was dangerous, grueling, and vital, ‘Rosie’ offers an incomplete portrait of women at war, for they were far from only riveters…

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More Than a Hospital: Life at Morley

We might imagine a military hospital to be nothing but depressing and tragic, exhibiting only the terrible consequences of war. The Station Hospital in Morley, a village near Wymondham around thirteen miles west of Norwich, was no exception, caring for those with severe and sometimes fatal injuries. However, the hospital had another side, indeed maybe even another purpose, to the dispiriting task of tending to wounded soldiers. Those who experienced Morley remember it not simply as a hospital, but also as a place where music played, where joy and happiness were had, and where lifelong friends and lovers were found.

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